Catania

Catania has been a prize of many empires over the centuries, from Greeks to Romans to Arabs to Normans to Spaniards (to name a few). But its citizens have a more dangerous enemy right in their backyard—Mount Etna, Europe’s largest and most active volcano, which destroyed the city with earthquakes and lava flows in 1693. Look closely at the baroque buildings dating from after the eruption—you’ll notice a creative use of lava.

Museo Storico dello Sbarco in Sicilia 1943

The "Allied Landings in Sicily Museum" (Museo Storico dello Sbarco in Sicilia 1943) is housed in one of the buildings forming the "Ciminiere" cultural centre. The museum narrates the events that took place in Sicily from 10 July to 8 September 1943. This period is still recent history, only seventy years have passed and many senior citizens can still recount the experience. Everything that we...

Chiesa San Benedetto

The house of the cloistered nuns of Saint Benedict was built from April 1334, then it was razed to the ground by the earthquake of 1693, which spared only five out of the sixty religious who used to inhabit it. The church and the monastery were rebuilt between 1708 and 1763, thanks to the work of, among others, the architect G.B. Vaccarini and the painter from Messina G. Tuccari. A large part of...

Monastero dei Benedettini

Il Monastero di San Nicolo l'Arena di Catania (#monasterocatania), gioiello del tardo barocco siciliano e tra i complessi benedettini piu' grandi d'Europa. L'edificio monastico, che nasce nel '500 e si sviluppa fino ai giorni nostri, e' un esempio di integrazione architettonica tra le epoche: contraddistinto da molteplici trasformazioni oggi e' patrimonio mondiale dell'Unesco. Sede del DiSUM...